Easter in Europe

Just like many places in Europe have large German Christmas markets, there are Easter markets. The one here in Prague is really big (that’s where I got my pastry yesterday), and it has many decorated stalls selling traditional Czech food, as well as crafts and other things. Though 90% of Czechs are atheist, they still celebrate Easter traditions.

Today I was walking around the market when I heard some loud, upbeat drum music coming from nearby. I turned the corner and saw a procession of people following three men on stilts and a trailer pulling a man playing the drum set that I had heard. I decided to join the crowd and followed them on their journey through the streets.

At one point, they stopped so that one of the stilt guys could put together two pieces of wood he had been carrying to assemble a cross. Then another stilt guy crowned him with a circle of thorns, and the walk continued. Eventually we reached a small square and everyone gathered round as the Jesus stilt guy re-enacted being crucified. Then a pastor came out to read a sermon. I left at that point because he was reading in Czech, and Molly was waiting for me.

Ultimately, the whole thing seemed a little half-hearted, but I guess if less than 10% of the population cares about it, they probably didn’t feel like putting any more effort into the performance. I still enjoyed seeing it because I’ve never done anything for Good Friday before, so it was interesting to be in a place that observed it.

Love, Elizabeth

Most of my favorite short stories are by Franz Kafka. Because he is a German author, I always assumed that he was from Germany. It turns out he was born here in Prague, lived here for most of his short life, and is buried in the Jewish Cemetery here. Though he was fluent in Czech, he wrote in German, and that is why he isn’t considered a Czech writer. He is nonetheless revered here in Prague, as evidenced by the Kafka Museum (which I didn’t have a chance to go to this time) and the above statue.

It depicts Kafka riding on the back of an empty business suit, which is a scene from one of his early stories, “Depiction of a Struggle.” It also represents Kafka’s troubled and complex relationship with his father. Around the base of the statue is the image of a beetle, which represents “The Metamorphosis,” perhaps one of his most well-known stories, and definitely worth a read.

I like Kafka because I think he’s kind of like the Lady Gaga of literature. He did things with writing that nobody else had done before, and so many modern writers are still inspired by him. I’m so glad I had a chance to see some of the places that inspired him.

Love, Elizabeth

Most of my favorite short stories are by Franz Kafka. Because he is a German author, I always assumed that he was from Germany. It turns out he was born here in Prague, lived here for most of his short life, and is buried in the Jewish Cemetery here. Though he was fluent in Czech, he wrote in German, and that is why he isn’t considered a Czech writer. He is nonetheless revered here in Prague, as evidenced by the Kafka Museum (which I didn’t have a chance to go to this time) and the above statue.

It depicts Kafka riding on the back of an empty business suit, which is a scene from one of his early stories, “Depiction of a Struggle.” It also represents Kafka’s troubled and complex relationship with his father. Around the base of the statue is the image of a beetle, which represents “The Metamorphosis,” perhaps one of his most well-known stories, and definitely worth a read.

I like Kafka because I think he’s kind of like the Lady Gaga of literature. He did things with writing that nobody else had done before, and so many modern writers are still inspired by him. I’m so glad I had a chance to see some of the places that inspired him.

Love, Elizabeth

This tasty Czech treat is called a Trdelník. It’s a pretzel-like cake that has been baked around a metal rod and then covered with cinnamon sugar and almond slices. I had mine with chocolate spread slathered in the middle.

Love, Elizabeth

This tasty Czech treat is called a Trdelník. It’s a pretzel-like cake that has been baked around a metal rod and then covered with cinnamon sugar and almond slices. I had mine with chocolate spread slathered in the middle.

Love, Elizabeth